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Appendix 3



TAPESCRIPTS

APPENDIX

Tapescript (Unit 1. Listening, p. 10)

I used to have a friend called Rosa. We were together at secondary school. When we were 16 she moved because of herfather's job, but we kept in touch. We used to write long letters to each other — email didn't exist then. I went to stay with her a couple of times, too. We lost touch after university. I'd love to see her again. We used to be really good friends.

I used to hate a couple of teachers at school, but I suppose the one I hated the most was my French teacher. He was really horrible. I don't think he liked children or even teaching. He used to be rude to us and he didn't explain things well. I failed French — it was the only subject I everfailed at school.

I used to play a lot of squash, but I recently started playing tennis and now I much prefer it. The problem with squash is that it's pretty hard and aggressive. The great thing about tennis is that it's outdoors, and I play doubles with three friends. It's less competitive and more fun. The only problem is you can't play when it rains.

Tapescript (Unit 1. Check Your Skills, p. 18)

I'm an only child. I don't think I was spoilt, maybe I was. I don't consider myself to be selfish, but I'm probably not very good at seeing things from other people's point of view. Maybe that's because I'm not very imaginative. I am quite responsible and organised though, so probably most of what the psychologist says is true for me.

Er — other people in my family — well my wife is a youngest child. I think she's quite affectionate, that's the most hard-working person I know, and I'd say she's charming but she's not manipulative.

My dad is an oldest child and I think it's true that he is much more responsible that his brother and sister, and I know they think he was always quite bossy. Actually they still think he is.

Tapescript (Unit 2. Listening, p. 26)

A My mother is an accountant in a pharmaceutical company. She has been an accountant for over 20 years. At this particular company she has already been working for 10 years. She is a professional accountant with a broad work experience.

It took her five years to get higher education at the university. But my mum says that a professional accountant should always get additional education. So my mum is often present at different seminars, workshops, conferences and what not. There she learns about new laws and rules in the field. She listens to reports and discusses the ways of applying fresh knowledge in practice.

She often gathers financial reports and watches if everything is in proper order.

B My father is a journalist. He chose this creative profession because he was, of course, a creative person. After he graduated from the university, he was offered a vacancy in the local newspaper. Now he visits different events and meetings in order to write articles and inform the society about events. He also meets people and takes their interviews.

The chief Editor is satisfied with my father's work. His colleagues are very educated. They all work as a team. The profession of a journalist is exciting, though sometimes may be dangerous.

C My brother Max is a system administrator. He works in a well-known computer corpo-ration. His work is well-paid, very interesting and responsible. He oversees the work of 1,200 computers. He is responsible for the safety of all documents and files. He prevents the system from receiving viruses. Sometimes he installs different programs and sometimes works as a programmer. He develops different programs, necessary for the effective work of the corporation.

Max knows a lot about office equipment like computers, scanners, Xerox machines and printers. He can easily fix them, too. All his colleagues respect him for his professionalism.

Tapescript (Unit 2. Check Your Skills, p. 34)

Dear Ms Wright,

I'm writing in response to your advertisement for young people to work at your summer camps this summer.

I'm 16 at the moment but will be 17 on 6 June. As for my knowledge of English, I have no problem communicating with the English-speaking visitors. A major reason why I am applying for the summer job is to be in an English-speaking environment for the summer.

As for sport, I play handball in the school team. In fact, this is one of the things I like best about school. I'm not very good at sitting in a classroom for long, so I like to get out for training sessions.

I'm afraid I have no experience in organising games, but I'm the secretary of the school's drama group and I was recently in charge of organising a performance for parents.

I have some experience in working with young people. I often baby-sit my neighbours' three children (aged 7,9 and 11). I find it great fun; they are so open and direct at that age.

I would very much appreciate the chance to work at one of your camps this summer. It would give me further experience in organising and hopefully improve my English — and it sounds fun.

Yours sincerely,

Iryna Fedirko

Tapescript (Unit 3. Listening, p. 42)

Primary education takes place in infant schools and junior schools. Children go to school at the age of 5 and start secondary education when they are 11 or 12. Compulsory secondary education lasts five years. Traditionally secondary schools are divided into five years called 'forms' (from 1 to 5). Unlike Ukrainian schoolchildren, English pupils go to the 1st form only when they are 11 or 12.

At the age of 16 they may either leave school or continue their education in the sixth form. Most British children get their secondary education at comprehensive schools.

At the age of 14 or 15 in the 3rd or 4th form of secondary school, pupils begin to choose their exam subjects and prepare for their General Certificate of Secondary Education which they take at the age of 16. Many people decide to leave school at the age of 16, and they can go to a Further Educational College, where they choose more practical courses, for example, typing, hairdressing, engineering.

Pupils who stay on into the 6th form, Iasting2years more, prepare for their'A'Level Exams. 'A' stands for 'Advanced'. Good 'A' Level results in tow or five subjects are necessary to get a place at one of British universities.

Secondary education is available to all children in Britain. Nevertheless some parents prefer private education for their kids. No more than 5 per cent attend private schools. They are expensive. Private schools are sometimes called 'independent' and those ones, which teach pupils aged 13 to 19 years old are called 'public'.

In a lot of public schools children live as well as study, they are called boarding schools. Among public schools there are boys' schools, girls' school and mixed schools. The most famous British public schools include Harrow, Winchester and Eton which date back to the 15th century.

Many people in Britain are against public schools. They believe that all children in the country should have equal opportunities at the start and go to a usual British comprehensive school.

Tapescript (Unit 3. Check Your Skills, p. 52)

Mike: What did you think of the exams, Pete? I think they were dead easy.

Pete: Maybe they were easy enough for you but they were much too hard for me.

Mike: Oh, come on. You've probably done better than you think.

Pete: No, I'm certain I've failed in Latin, and most likely in French and History, too. Thank goodness it's all overthough. We can forget about it now—at least until the results come out.

Mike: Yes. Now I can get on with reading all the books I've been wanting to read for months, but haven't had time for.

Pefe. What!... Well, it's up to you. I'm not going to open another book for months.

Mike: Well... I'll take a day or two off perhaps. But if I'm going to university in October, I'll have to get down to some serious work again pretty soon.

Pete: I've got to get through the A level exams first. I'll worry about university if and when I ever get there.

Mike: That's the trouble with you. You always try to do everything at the last minute.

Pete: And you're too serious; that's your trouble. You're always with your nose in the books.

Mike:\Ne\\, I like reading.

Pete: And I can't stand it. I don't know why I decided to try to go to the university in the first place. I think I'll run away and join the army or something.

Tapescript (Unit 4. Listening, p. 61)

Good morning. Today is Shrove Tuesday, and I'm going to talk about... yes, pancakes. This is my recipe. It's very easy and very good.

You'll need:
150 grams of flour;
an egg;
300 ml of milk;
2 tablespoons of oil;
a little oil for frying the pancakes;
some sugar and two lemons.

That's all. Let's make the pancakes...

Mix the flour and the egg with a fork. Slowly mix in the milk and the oil. Put a little oil in the pan. Heat the pan. It must be very hot. Pour in two tablespoons of mixture. Cook for about 45 seconds. Toss the pancakes once. Cook for another 45 seconds. Serve with a little sugar and lots of lemon juice. That's it. Have a nice Tuesday and enjoy your pancakes!

Tapescript (Unit 4. Check your skills, p. 71)

Interviewer: George, why did you decide to open a restaurant in Argentina?

George: I'd always wanted to have my own restaurant and it would have been very expensive to do that in England.

Interviewer: What kind of food do you serve?

George: Mainly international dishes like pasta. Steak and fries, risotto — but we also do several English dishes as well.

Interviewer: Were Argentinian people surprised when they heard that an English chef was going to open a restaurant here?

George: Yes, they were — very! I think people don't usually expect the English to be good cooks.

Interviewer: Is your chef English?

George: No, he's Argentinian — but I've taught him to make some English dishes.

Tapescript (Unit 5. Listening, p. 79)

Mike: Hi, Christina. How are you?

Christina: Hello, Mike. I'm fine. And you?

Mike: Yes, things are okay. But look. I'm calling to ask you a favour. Well, to ask you for a bit of advice really.

Christina: OK. What did you want to know? Mike: Well, Christie, you know all about the information superhighway. I hear a lot about it these days, but I'm completely lost. I think I should get connected, but I don't know how to set about it. Can you explain, clearly and slowly, what exactly the Internet is? Christina: Yes, of course. Basically, it's a network of communication and information. It operates globally. You can access information easily and immediately on different systems. You can send messages instantly on email, that's electronic mail. You can send and read messages with it. You can access other computers. The list is very long, and new things are happening all the time.

Mike: Who uses the Internet, mostly?

Christina: Anyone wanting information. Anyone who needs to communicate. Professionals and individuals who want to do any kind of research.

Mike: So, what do I need to do to get connected?

Christina: Well, first you need some equipment. You need four things: a computer... a Mac or PC, or any computer with a hard disc. And then you need a modem. The speed of the modem is important. You want one that works fast. And you want one that can compress files. And get a fax modem if you want to send faxes by computer.

Mike: Right. A modem. You said four things. What else do I need?

Christina: Software and a service provider. You usually get the software from the service provider. There is often a difference in the price of service providers, so check them carefully before you get connected. Find a service provider near you. If the service provider is not near, you phone bill for long-distance calling will be very high.

Mike: What do I need to know about software?

Christina: The basic Internet software kit should consist of a dialler.

Mike: A dialler? What's that?

Christina: It is a programme to get you logged in, or connected, with your provider.

Mike: I see. And then I suppose I need email?

Christina: Yes, email is absolutely essential. And you probably also need Gopher.

Mike: What is that?

Interviewer: What kind of English dishes do you have on your menu?

George: Well, we're open in the morning, and we serve traditional English breakfast, and then we have a lot of English desserts at lunchtime, for example, trifle — that's a typical English dessert made with fruit and cake and cream. And we do proper English teas in the afternoon—tea with cakes and sandwiches.

Interviewer: Are the English dishes popular?

George: Yes, especially the desserts and cakes. I think people here in Argentina have a very sweet tooth.

Interviewer: And finally is there any English food that you really miss here?

George: The thing I miss most living in Argentina is English cheese. I really miss Stilton — which is a wonderful English blue cheese. It's not as famous as some of the French cheeses like Roquefort but I think it should be. You should try it!

Interviewer: I'll try! Thank you for the interview.

George: Welcome to the restaurant!

Tapescript (Unit 5. Listening, p. 79)

Mike: Hi, Christina. How are you?

Christina: Hello, Mike. I'm fine. And you?

Mike: Yes, things are okay. But look. I'm calling to ask you a favour. Well, to ask you for a bit of advice really.

Christina: OK. What did you want to know? Mike: Well, Christie, you know all about the information superhighway. I hear a lot about it these days, but I'm completely lost. I think I should get connected, but I don't know how to set about it. Can you explain, clearly and slowly, what exactly the Internet is?

Christina: Yes, of course. Basically, it's a network of communication and information. It operates globally. You can access information easily and immediately on different systems. You can send messages instantly on email, that's electronic mail. You can send and read messages with it. You can access other computers. The list is very long, and new things are happening all the time.

Mike: Who uses the Internet, mostly?

Christina: Anyone wanting information. Anyone who needs to communicate. Professionals and individuals who want to do any kind of research.

Mike: So, what do I need to do to get connected?

Christina: Well, first you need some equipment. You need four things: a computer... a Mac or PC, or any computer with a hard disc. And then you need a modem. The speed of the modem is important. You want one that works fast. And you want one that can compress files. And get a fax modem if you want to send faxes by computer.

Mike: Right. A modem. You said four things. What else do I need?

Christina: Software and a service provider. You usually get the software from the service provider. There is often a difference in the price of service providers, so check them carefully before you get connected. Find a service provider near you. If the service provider is not near, you phone bill for long-distance calling will be very high.

Mike: What do I need to know about software?

Christina: The basic Internet software kit should consist of a dialler.

Mike: A dialler? What's that?

Christina: It is a programme to get you logged in, or connected, with your provider.

Mike: I see. And then I suppose I need email?

Christina: Yes, email is absolutely essential. And you probably also need Gopher.

Mike: What is that?

Christina: It is a programme which searches out information on the net. You can get Gopher, or one of the other programmes for searching. Then there's FTP. You can download software from other computers with FTP.

Mike: You're getting a bit complicated for me!

Christina: Hah,., hah ... hah! You'll soon get the idea.

Mike: So, all I have to do now is to find a service provider?

Tapescript (Unit 5. Check Your Skills, p. 90)

With the rise of the Internet, information technology is now beginning to have much more influence on education. Two areas which are becoming more and more significant are 'blogs' and 'wikis'.

The word 'blob' is short for 'Weblog'. A blog is an online diary or 'log' of someone's life, thoughts, or opinions. Anyone can create their own 'blog' and blogging is becoming extremely popular — type 'blog' into Google and you'll get over 500 million results. For educational purposes, academics, teachers, and students create blogs as personal online study sites: places to work together and share information and ideas. Some universities even give their students and staff free space on a server to start their own blogs.

'Wikis' are websites where anyone can add content and make changes, so that the site becomes a group creation — 'wiki' stands for 'What I Know is'. These sites can be a valuable source of information and opinion for students, though the Information may not be totally accurate — some academics refuse to use them. Perhaps the best-known wiki is the online encyclopaedia Wikipedia which has more than 1 million entries in over 100 languages. Wikipedia is working hard to make sure that its information is completely accurate, so students will be able to use it with confidence, and there's no doubt that it is an incredible resource.

Tapescript 1 (Unit 6. Listening, p. 99)

1 The Netherlands is very flat and part of the country is below the level of the sea. The people there have to make sure that the walls by the sea are very strong. Usually, there is no problem, but in January 1995, it rained and rained for more than two weeks. The water in the canals and rivers rose higher and higher, and thousands of people had to leave their homes because of the danger of floods. They went to other towns and waited until the water level fell again.

2 Hurricanes are very strong winds that come from the sea. Warm wet air rises in a spiral and goes faster and faster — over 160 km per hour. In 1992, 'Hurricane Andrew' hit Florida. The people there had to leave their homes and move to other towns and wait. When the hurricane arrived, it killed 15 people and destroyed thousands of buildings. More than 50,000 people had nowhere to live.

3 Sometimes in desert climate, it does not rain for a very long time. This happened between 1968 to 1974 in the Sahel, in West Africa. The winds changed direction and the sea did not receive any rain for six years. Hundreds of thousands of people and nearly half of the animals in the area died because there wasn't enough water. People had to walk many kilometers to find water.

Tapescript 2 (Unit 6. Listening, p. 99)

As soon as the earthquake starts, students should get under the desks immediately and wait until the teacher tells them it is safe to come out. The teacher should at the same time go immediately to the teacher's desk, get underneath it and stay there till the danger is over. Students must not argue with the teacher or question instructions.

As soon as the vibration stops, all students should walk towards the exit and go straight to the school playground or any open space such as a square or a park. They must wait there until the teacher tells them it is safe to go. Whatever you do, don't panic: most accidents occur not as a result of the earthquake itself but from people panicking.

If you are at home when the earthquake occurs, get immediately under the table in the living room or kitchen. Choose the biggest and strongest table you can find. You must not go anywhere near the windows and don't go out onto the balcony. Once the shaking have stopped, you can come out from under the table but you must leave the building straight away. You should walk down the stairs and should not use the lift — there may be a power cut as a result of the earthquake and you could find yourself trapped inside the lift for hours.

If you are in the street when the earthquake takes place, do not stand near buildings, fences or walls — move away as quickly as possible and try to find a large open space to wait in. Standing under trees could also be dangerous.

Tapescript (Unit 6. Check Your Skills, p. 109)

We, humans, now dominate the Earth — and our planet is in danger of suffering from our activities.

But from time to time the Earth threatens us, warns of the danger of killing the planet and ourselves.

We have to be very careful what we do with nature, provoking to some extent natural disasters like droughts, sandstorms and famines in Africa, floods in Netherlands, hurricanes in the USA, volcanoes and earthquakes in Turkey, Japan, Mexico, Italy, Armenia, typhoons and tidal waves, landslides and fires. Natural disasters make big problems and people all over the world come to help the regions where the catastrophe has happened. Different countries send to the area of the natural disaster food and medical supplies, as well as doctors, nurses, blankets, tents and clothes.

Natural catastrophes, being great tragedies, teach us to be merciful to the other people and to our planet — the Earth.

Tapescript (Unit 7. Listening, p. 118)

Visiting the Louvre is a special experience, but you need to know where to start. The first thing to recognise is that it's huge and you can't hope to see everything in a day — so don't try. Get a handy map of the museum with your entrance ticket and it highlights the main attractions, such as the Mona Lisa.

You can visit the Louvre and not see the Mona Lisa, but my tip would be to see it first — though you may have to run to avoid the crowds! When you've done that, use the plan to look for the galleries that sound the most interesting to you, and spend the morning visiting them, when you have plenty of energy. Then have some lunch at one of the reasonably priced cafés, and spend the afternoon relaxing and finding surprises without looking at your map. The beauty of any museum or gallery is personal discovery.

On a practical note, there are toilets located on all floors, and several shops selling really good books, guides, postcards, and souvenirs. Photography, surprisingly, is permitted.

You can borrow an audio guide for fee, which is very useful and worth the money. You have to leave a credit card or passport or any other document. There are several stalls offering audio guides, so you need to remember which one you got it from, as you must return it to the same one to get your credit card or passport back. The Louvre is organised into 'wings' with names (for example, Denon) and the audio guides are at the entrance to each wing.

Finally, the easiest way to enter the Louvre is via the Metro entrance, rather than from the street, as the lines are shorter!

Have a wonderful visit!

Tapescript (Unit 7. Check Your Skills, p. 132)

I want to tell you about my last visit to the Museum of Ukrainian Art in Kyiv. It is one of the richest museums, a treasure-house of the finest works of outstanding Ukrainian artists of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century.

The Kyiv State Museum of Ukrainian Art was opened in 1936. Its numerous galleries contain one of the richest collections of fine arts from the 15th century. This collection is arranged in 21 halls. I was deeply impressed by numerous works of classical painters and famous Ukrainian artists such as Shevchenko, Murashko, Vasilkovskyi and Pymonenko which are on display there. The oldest exhibit displayed in the museum is the wooden relief of 'St George with Scenes from His Life' produced in the 13th century. Visitors can see many icons of the 16th-18th centuries. In another hall we can find the largest collection of Ukrainian portrait art and folk art. To my mind, the portraits of Cossack commanders are extremely effective.

An extensive art collection of the 19th century includes the works of Shevchenko, Sternberg, Sokolovand other famous painters.

The museum has several rooms with a large number of paintings made by contemporary painters, such as Melikov, Yablonska and others.

Each year the Museum of Ukrainian Art is visited by foreign visitors and numerous delegations from many cities and villages of our country. I think people should visit museums like this, because art plays an important role in upbringing our emotions, tastes and feelings, it enriches our inner world and cultivates love for people and nature.

Tapescript (Unit 8. Listening, p. 140)
Sports in the USA

Reporter: As I understand, American sports are in many ways different from European sports. Would you mind answering a few questions?

Brown: Sure. I'll be only too glad to help you. But I'm no expert, remember.

Reporter: Don't worry about that. My questions are only very general ones. For example, which sport in America is the most popular?

Brown: That's difficult to say. It depends on your meaning of popular. We consider baseball our national sport. But football, too, is extremely popular and attracts crowds of spectators.

Reporter: Would you give me a few basic facts about these two?

Brown: Sure. Let's start with baseball. This typical American game dates back long before the Civil War. Baseball is mainly a professional sport. In other words, the players receive a salary. There are sixteen major teams and each one represents an American city.

Reporter: Do all sixteen teams play each other?

Brown: No, they don't. There are two leagues of eight teams each and in the fall of the year, the winner of one league plays the winner of the other. We call this contest the World Series, though it's a national competition.

Reporter: Does football have a world series?

Brown: No. The major football teams belong to the colleges or universities and are nonprofessional. There is no rigid national organisation and no definite way to determine the national champion.

Reporter: Do only students attend these college games?

Brown: By no means. The college teams attract the general public. Nearly all the major schools have built huge stadiums to take care of the spectators. It's not at all unusual for eighty or ninety thousand people to attend a game. Besides, there are some professional teams.

Reporter: And in what way does your football differ from European football?

Brown: In many ways. Our football is much slower. Football players play with an oval ball, using their feet and hands. And we have a special name for European football. It's called «soccer» in the United States.

Reporter: You've given me a very good overall picture. I really do thank you.

Brown: You're more than welcome. I was only too glad to help you.

Tapescript (Unit 8. Check Your Skills, p. 150)

Perhaps it is football (soccer) which can be considered as the most popular game in Ukraine. The lion's share of success in this kind of sports belongs to the club 'Dynamo' Kyiv that started its history in 1924. However, while speaking of Ukrainian football it would not be correct to mention only one team — there are a number of serious representatives on football arena. It is first of all 'Shakhtar' in Donetsk and 'Dnipro' from Dnipropetrovsk. A further important step in the development of football will be the European championship 2012.

In 1994 Independent Ukraine sent its national team to the Olympic Games for the first time. At the 17th Winter Games in Lillehammer, young figure skater Oksana Baiul went down into Olympic history, winning the 1st gold medal for Ukraine. Olena Hrushyna and Ruslan Honcharov won bronze medals at the last world championship in figure-skating.

Many Ukrainian athletes are well known throughout the world now. Lilia Podkopaieva, Kateryna Serebrianska proved themselves as winners at world and European championships in calisthenics. Andrii Shevchenko, a Ukrainian soccer player, started his football career at Dynamo Kyiv and after his playing for several foreign teams came back to Dynamo again.

The Gold Fish of Ukraine is Yana Klochkova, the Olympic champion and four-time world champion Gymnast Valery Honcharov won the gold medal at the Olympics in Athens and a silver medal in Sydney in the year 2000.

Yurii Bilonoh, a Ukrainian athlete, showed excellent results in the shot-putting event at the Olympic Games in Athens in 2004, winning the gold medal.

Vasyl Virastiuk holds the title of the Strongest Man on Earth. He has won several Strong Man world championships.

One cannot help mentioning the legendary Klychko brothers, Vitalii and Volodymyr, heavyweight world champions, whose achievements have made them an example of courage and the will to win.

Wrestling is a well-developed sport in Ukraine, too. Elbrus Tadeiev and Iryna Merleni won the highest awards in the Olympiad in Athens.

The Olympic victories of Ukrainian athletes are quite impressive: 400 trophies, including 180 gold medals.

These results say in favour of Ukraine — the country, which ranks with the world's 20 leading Olympic countries.

PHRASAL VERBS

APPENDIX

add up to find total of The shop assistant added up what I'd bought and told me total.
back up to make a copy of the information on a computer programme or disk Don't forget to back up your important data.
blow up to explode Luckily, the bomb didn't blow up.
break down to stop working (for a machine, etc.) Our car broke down on the motorway.
break in(to) to enter illegally A house in Brecon Place was broken into last night.
bring up to take care of a child until he or she becomes an adult She brought up three sons on her own.
build up to increase These exercises are good for building up leg strength.
call back to ring again on the phone I'll call you back later when you're not so busy.
call off to cancel The concert has been called off because of the weather.
calm down to become/make calmer The woman finally calmed down and explained what had happened.
carry on to continue The phone rang, but Mark just carried on watching TV.
catch up (with) to reach the same point/level as He's missed so much school that he's going to find it hard to catch up.
charge up to put electricity into a piece of equipment My mobile phone isn't working — I need to charge it up.
cheer up to become/make happier I started to cheer up when the sun came out.
clear up to tidy I'll clear up if you want to go to bed.
come across to find something by chance I came across a word I'd never seen before.
come back (from) to return (from) Give me a call when you come back from Greece.
come on to be quicker Come on, or we'll be late!
come out to be published When does her new book come out?
cross out to draw a line through something written Just across it out and rewrite it correctly.
cut down (on) to do less of something (smoking, etc.) I'm trying to cut down on the amount of sugar I eat.
cut off to disconnect (phone, electricity, etc.) Pay the electricity bill tomorrow or they might cut us off.
cut off to completely remove by cutting Keep your roses healthy by cutting off any dead flowers.
do up to button/zip up a piece of clothing It's very windy, so do your coat up.
drop in to come without an appointment I might drop in for tea some time this week.
drop out to quit a class, school, etc. I dropped out of Science because it was too difficult.
eat out to eat at a restaurant Would you like to stay in or eat out tonight?
fall down to trip and fall I fell down and hurt my knee.
fall out (with) to have an argument with someone and stop being friends Have you two fallen out?
fill in to add information in the spaces on a form, etc. Just fill in this application form, please.
fill up to make something completely full Just fill this bowl up with sugar and put it on the table.
find out to discover information, etc I don't want Jerry to find out about this.
get away with to escape punishment for They have repeatedly broken the law and got away with it.
get in(to) to enter a car I hurt my head as I was getting into the car.
get off to leave a bus/train/etc. You need to get off the bus opposite the supermarket.
get on (with) to have a good relationship (with) She seems to get on with everybody.
get on(to) to enter a bus/train/etc. You can buy a ticket when you get on the bus.
get out (of) to leave a
car/building/room/etc.
Quick! Get out of the car!
get over to recover from (an illness, etc.) It can take weeks to get over an illness like that.
get up to leave your bed He never gets up before nine.
give away to get something free of charge They're giving away free tickets at the cinema!
give back to return something you've taken/borrowed Could you give my CDs back because you've had them for two weeks.
give up to stop doing something you do regularly You should give up smoking.
go away to leave a place/someone Why don't you just go away and leave me alone?
go back (to) to return (to) I can't wait to go back to Italy.
go off to no longer be fresh Has this milk gone off?
go on to continue happening or doing something Please go on with your work while I speak to the head teacher.
go on to happen There isn't much going on in this town in the evening.
go out to stop burning The fire must have gone out during the night.
go out with to be the boyfriend/girlfriend of Greg used to go out with Katy.
grow up to become older (for children) He rarely saw his father while he was growing up.
hack into to get into someone else's computer system without permission in order to look at information or do something illegal Someone hacked into the computers at work and destroyed important data.
hang on to wait Just hang on — I'll be ready in a minute.
hang up to put clothes in a wardrobe, etc. The women hung up their coats and sat down.
hang up to put the receiver down to end a phone call I can't believe that Jessica hung up without saying goodbye!
have on to wear (a piece of clothing) The man had a strange hat on.
hurry up to do something more quickly We haven't got much time, so hurry up!
join in to participate, take part Ask them if you can play — I'm sure they'll let you join in.
keep on (doing something) to continue (doing something) Let's keep on hiking... it's such a beautiful day.
keep out to prevent from entering Cars should be kept out of the city centre.
key something in to put information into a computer using a keyboard Key in your password.
leave out to not include Don't leave your brother out — let him play with you and your friends.
let down to disappoint You've really let me down.
lie down to start lying (on a bed, etc.) I'm going to go and lie down for a while.
log off to disconnect from the Internet/a website Don't forget to log off when you've finished checking your email.
log in/on(to) to connect to the Internet/a website You need your password to log on.
log off/out to finish using a computer system Don't forget to log off/out when you've finished.
look after to take care of It's hard work looking after three children all day.
look up to try to find information in a book, etc. I had look the word up in a dictionary.
make up to invent an explanation, excuse, etc. He made up some excuse about the dog eating his homework.
move in to start living in a new house, etc. We're moving in next week.
pay back to return money (to someone) Did you pay Denise back?
pick up to lift something from the floor, a table, etc. Please pick those toys up and put them away.
pick up (email) to connect to the Internet and access emails I'll take my laptop so I should be able to pick up my emails while I'm away.
plug in to connect to an electricity supply The computer isn't working because you haven't plugged it in.
point out to tell someone important information He pointed out that we had two hours of free time before dinner.
print out to make a paper copy of something on a computer Let me print those photographs out for you.
pull off to break by pulling I pulled off the arm of my sunglasses by mistake.
put away to return something to where it belongs He put the notebook away and stood up.
put back to return something to where it was Can you put the book back when you've finished with it?
put down to stop holding Emma put her bag down and went upstairs.
put off to delay to a later time Can we put the meeting off until tomorrow?
put on to gain (weight) I don't want to put on any more weight!
put on to start wearing (a piece of clothing) Put your gloves and scarf on — it's cold outside.
put out to make something stop burning It took three firefighters to put the fire out.
put up to put something on a wall (e.g. a picture) The teachers will put a notice up about the new courses.
read out to say something out loud which you are reading He read the list of names out.
rip up to tear into pieces Rip up this piece of paper when you've finished reading it.
rub out to remove with a rubber I can't rub it out because I wrote it in pen.
run away (from) to escape by running The thief ran away from the police officers.
run out (of) to not have any left Many hospitals are running out of money.
save up (for) to save money
(for a specific purpose)
I'm saving up for a new electric guitar.
scroll up/down to move up/down a web page or other document on a computer screen Scroll up to the top of the page.
send off to make a player leave a game (e.g. football) It was a very bad foul and the referee sent the player off.
set off to start a journey Go to sleep because we're setting off early in the morning.
set up to start (a business, organisation, etc.) My dad is going to set up a taxi company.
share out to give a part of something to a group of people The money will be shared out between 30 different environmental organisations.
shut up to stop talking, stop making a noise Just shut up a minute and let me tell you what happened!
sit down to (start to) sit Please, sit down and make yourselves comfortable.
sort out solve a problem Investigators are still trying to sort out why the accident happened.
speak up to talk more loudly so someone can hear you You have to speak up a bit because my gran's a bit deaf.
split up to end a relationship Tommy and Liz have just split up. It's very sad!
stand up to (start to) stand You have the chair. I don't mind eating standing up.
stay up to go to bed late We stayed up until two o'clock last night.
switch/turn on to touch a switch to make a machine or electrical device start working When I tried to switch/turn on my computer in the morning, nothing happened.
switch/turn off to touch a switch to make an electrical device stop working Would the last person to leave the room please switch/turn off the lights.
take away to remove Have they taken the rubbish away yet?
take back to return something to the place it came from I'm going to take my library books back.
take down to remove (from a high place) The old man took a large book down from a shelf.
take off to leave the ground Let's go and watch the planes taking off while we wait.
take off to remove (a piece of clothing) It felt good to finally take my shoes off after a long day.
take over to take control of (a business, etc.) The shopping centre has been taken over by an American company.
take up to start (a hobby, sport, etc.) I've taken up stamp collecting and it's really interesting.
throw away to put something in a rubbish bin Have you thrown the papers away?
try on to put on (a piece of clothing) to see how it looks and if it fits You should try it on to see if it's the right size.
turn down to lower the volume of Turn the radio down — I'm trying to work.
turn off to stop a machine working Will you turn the television off, please?
turn on to start a machine working Will you turn the television on, please?
turn over to turn something so the other side is towards you You may turn over your exam papers now.
turn up to increase the volume of We asked out teacher to turn the CD up, so that we could hear it.
wake up to stop being asleep Wake up! It's nearly ten o'clock!
wash up to wash plates, cups, cutlery, etc. 1 can help to cook and wash up.
watch out to be careful Watch out — you're going to hit that car!
work out to find the solution to a problem, etc. We can't work out how to get the Internet connection going.
write down to write information on a piece of paper Do you want to write down my phone number?
 


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